25 Random Scenic Geology and Landscape Photos

25 (or so) Random Scenic Geology and Landscape Photos

geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
A curious traveler at 10,100 feet in the Lemhi Mountains of central Idaho. The high slopes and valleys were glaciated in the last ice age.

Wherever I travel, I take a lot of pictures. Not all of them fit into any particular field trip, so it occurred to me to post them in a "trip" of their own!
There's not a lot of rhyme or reason to these, except that this batch is all from the western U.S., so here goes!


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Mining ghost town near Georgetown, Montana in the Flint Creek Mountains. Sapphires are mined in the area, but these mines mostly produced gold, copper, and silver.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 A "mansion" at Nevada City, southern Montana. Gold dredge mining brought a boom to this area beginning in the 1860's, and by the 1920's over $2.5 billion had been taken out of here and nearby Virginia City.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The Snake River emerging from the mountains out onto the Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho, which is the Yellowstone hot spot track. The river has a fascinating course that I'll examine in a future field trip.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The Snake River heads out onto the plains near Ribgy, Idaho. On the left you can see a cinder cone that erupted into the river, tossing gravel into the air along with the lava. The Menan Buttes will be an upcoming field trip.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Diamond Peak in the Lemhi Range and Birch Creek. The peak is Idaho's 4th highest at 12,200 feet. It is composed of Paleozoic limestone that formed on the continental shelf and was later shoved landward by tectonic collisions.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 High water in the Teton River floodplain in May near Rexburg, Idaho. The long-term, geologic floodplain is usually easy to spot - look for the relatively flat area around the river enclosed by bluffs or cliffs. The bluffs here are about 8 feet tall, and that makes all the difference in flood hazards.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The valley of Dillon, Montana, with the gorgeous Tobacco Root Mountains in the distance. This valley is part of the Basin and Range geologic province that is actively extending east-west. Dillon experienced a magnitude 5.6 earthquake in July 2005 that damaged some buildings. The epicenter was near where this picture was taken.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Cabins at Quartz Hill mining ghost town in the Pioneer Mountains of southwestern Montana. The area produced silver, lead, zinc, and copper from the late 1860's to the 1960's. 


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The DL ranch west of Dillon, Montana has an idyllic setting.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Trout in the Henry's Fork river at Big Spring, Idaho. See my post on Island Park, Idaho for more.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Continental divide road at Bannack Pass between Idaho (left) and Montana (right). This pass is the only dirt road that crosses the state line at Montana's southern border. The only other crossings are I-15 and U.S. 20 to the east and highway 29 to the northwest.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Me and my big redwood friend in Humboldt Redwoods, northern California. You have not lived until you've strolled through the redwoods!


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
Bear Lake Valley, northern Utah, is a graben (down-dropped valley) in the Basin and Range geologic province. The straight mountain front on the far side of the valley was formed along a normal fault that is still seismically active.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The Maybe phosphate mines in southeastern Idaho. Mines throughout this region take phosphate deposits out of the aptly-named Phosphoria Formation, which is Permian in age. The phosphate formed in shallow seas under unusual conditions.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 A cove in Palisades Reservoir in eastern Idaho. The reservoir fills a valley between two normal faults, but don't worry - the dam is not near them, and was built to withstand earthquakes.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Fractured cobbles and boulders in the Beaverhead Conglomerate, southwestern Montana near Lima. This Cretaceous alluvial fan complex was crushed when a thick mountain range was thrust on top of it.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 After the fire, near McCall, Idaho.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 A burned forest north of McCall, Idaho, a few years after a devastating fire. The bedrock is Cretaceous granite that geologists call a "batholith," meaning a very large exposure of igneous rock. The granite formed above a subduction zone when an ancestor of the Pacific plate was sinking under the North American plate. That sinking results in formation of vast quantities of magma and of course volcanoes, like at the Andes and Cascades mountains. The granite is magma that never erupted, instead crystallizing underground. The volcanoes that once sat above the Idaho Batholith have long since been eroded away, leaving only their roots.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Balanced rocks south of Kanab, Utah. They form when the softer siltstone below erodes away, leaving the harder sandstone stranded above.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Where is Wile E. Coyote when you need him?


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 A summer squall south of Leadore, Idaho. This area had a mining boom in the 1880's and 1900's, but like all mining booms those didn't last. Sporadic activity has taken place ever since.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Summer rainbow, Big Hole Mountains, eastern Idaho. These mountains are part of the Cretaceous thrust belt during which the continental margin was compressed and thrust landward, forming these folds and tremendous thrust faults. It was more recently uplifted as part of the Basin and Range crustal extension that is still ongoing in the West.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 The road beckons! Early July in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho. The red dirt is part of a conglomerate that formed as alluvial fans in front of the growing Cretaceous thrust belt mountain range.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Cabin, Lemhi Mountains, Idaho. The cabin sits in a glacial cirque - a semicircle of cliffs formed at the head of a glacier. Cirques often have a relatively flat, scenic floor like here, or they can hold lakes.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Colorado River south of Page, Arizona. An ancestor to the Colorado River used to flow northward here, but was captured by the Colorado and turned around.  The river is in deep canyons because the region was slowly uplifted about 5 million years ago, and the rivers easily eroded back down to their stable profiles closer to sea level. As a result, the Colorado flows from the shallow canyon here into the deeper canyon in the high plateau of the National Parkj - a seeming impossibility.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
 Geology Students working in the Caribou Range of eastern Idaho, part of the Cretacous thrust belt.


geology and landscape photos ©RocDocTravel.com
Golden Gate bridge towers poking through the fog, San Francisco, California.

I'll post random pictures like this again occasionally.

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